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Academic prioritization release expected next week after several delays

Academic prioritization is behind schedule, but Provost Gary Shapiro expects to release the results next week.

The process began in November 2010, when the provost asked all college deans to rank their degree programs on importance and funding needs.

Shapiro told Central Michigan Life in August the announcement would arrive near the end of September.

“The timeline is about two to three weeks behind schedule due to other university business and demands,” said Steve Smith, director of public relations. “(Shapiro) is currently reviewing his priority rankings and preparing his report to the campus, which will accompany his recommendations.”

Shapiro said he is in meetings Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, and is not hopeful about getting the findings out by Friday. He said it is about 95 percent complete and expects it to be announced sometime next week.

“There is significant university business beside the reprioritization process,” he said. “This is not a normal fall semester.”

Shapiro said the release was delayed because he has been busy with other responsibilities regarding issues with the budget, facilities and space.

When Shapiro was asked if the delay was caused by the contract conflict with the Faculty Association, he said there was a number of different issues he was currently dealing with and did not comment further.

Shapiro said he is going back through the data to double-check for any grammatical errors and problematic rankings. He is also developing a report to explain what has led to their findings and what CMU can do to move forward.

“We’re at the process of double-checking, editing my comments,” he said. “There is just a tremendous amount of data.”

After the editing process, if complete, Shapiro will go over the information with University President George Ross and make his recommendations. Ross has seen a preliminary draft, but he has not yet reviewed it in its entirety, Shapiro said.

Shapiro expects Ross to rely on his recommendations, he said.

5 Comments

  1. This is where the state should step in and stop the government universities from competing against each other thereby driving up costs and graduating too many students with too many useless degree programs. It’s also time to have a discussion on whether CMU is really an institution of higher learning, in the traditional sense, or a glorified vocational school whose sole focus to babysit kids for four, five and even six years before they get some job that really shouldn’t require a bachelor’s degree.

  2. This is where the state should step in and stop the government universities from competing against each other thereby driving up costs and graduating too many students with too many useless degree programs. It’s also time to have a discussion on whether CMU is really an institution of higher learning, in the traditional sense, or a glorified vocational school whose sole focus to babysit kids for four, five and even six years before they get some job that really shouldn’t require a bachelor’s degree.

    • mediacriticpa says:

      Absolutely Nick.  I’ve got good news.  Bob Geteski, the House Chairman of Higher Ed in Lansing, was quoted in Detroit and I agree.  We don’t need 14 schools offering Polish Studies.

      Actually, I think it’s 21 schools.  We don’t need to have 21 schools offering Polish, African and all the different ethnic studies.  We don’t need 21 schools offering Women’s Studies, Sports Studies, Journalism, Broadcasting, Sociology, etc.

      You’re right Nick.  The state should step in.

      Nick, at one time, CMU was a truly great university.  But, with PC, multiculturalism and the dummying down of the curriculum, it no longer is and it’s sad.

      Not sure why Gary can’t get this thing done in a day.  It’s pretty simple unless you’re a PC multiculturalist.  George Ross has said he’s one.

      Not sure why we need so many education majors when stats and studies show Michigan doesn’t need as many.

  3. Ben Steiner Brothers says:

    “We don’t need to have 21 schools offering Polish, African and all the different ethnic studies.  We don’t need 21 schools offering Women’s Studies, Sports Studies, Journalism, Broadcasting, Sociology, etc.”

    We don’t need your terrible posts, yet here you are.

  4. “Nick, at one time, CMU was a truly great university.  But, with PC,
    multiculturalism and the dummying down of the curriculum, it no longer
    is and it’s sad.”

    The dummy-ing down is ridiculous. What passes as “higher education” is no more than high school classes, especially the basic requisite classes. (And with the enhanced high school curriculum of a few years ago, I fail to see why someone who took algebra two in high school or advanced chemistry has to take a rudimentary math or science class a year or two later at CMU.)

    Here is an article from the liberal Bridge Magazine, produced by the liberal Center for Michigan, basically saying that we have way too many college students and way too much duplication in majors. It can be read at:

    http://bridgemi.com/2011/09/michigan-cant-fit-college-grads-into-job-slots/

    CMU used to be a teaching college. Michigan Tech used to be an engineering college. Back in the day, each school was forced to specialize. Since the 1960s, in part because of Johnson’s Great Society and the perceived notion that every high school graduate must go on to college, colleges have doubled and tripled in size and number. Institutions that pass themselves off as colleges or universities would have been laughed out of business 40 years ago.

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