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New D-Box seats offer viewers unique moviegoing experience

Claude McMaster, President and CEO of D-Box, sits in a D-Box motion chair designed for a movie theatre, in Longueuil, Que., Friday, March 20, 2009. (Photo courtesy of: Graham Hughes/THE CANADIAN PRESS)

Claude McMaster, President and CEO of D-Box, sits in a D-Box motion chair designed for a movie theatre, in Longueuil, Que., Friday, March 20, 2009. (Photo courtesy of: Graham Hughes/THE CANADIAN PRESS)

Mount Pleasant residents now have the ability to move with their movie at the Celebration! Cinema.

D-Box seats are designed to move along with the action on the screen, giving the viewer a more interactive experience. Viewers responded well to the new motion seating, Assistant Manager Lori Worden said.

“(People) love the demo out in the lobby,” the Lansing senior said. “They actually get to test it out and they get to see how it is before they even buy it.”

For $8 extra per ticket, the D-Box seats move viewers up, down, forward, backward and side to side throughout the movie. D-Box tickets can be purchased online or at the theater just like all the regular movies.

“It’s assigned seating and that makes it nice because then they get to pick which seat they want,” Worden said. “They only activate when you buy the ticket stamp.”

Sophomore Nicole Fosgate of Michigan Center said she opted for the $8 employee training session when the seat first got installed. Wanting to be able to better inform her customers, she ended up thoroughly enjoying her experience.

“It made me feel more into the movie, and a lot of people have said the same thing,” Fosgate said. “If you’re a person that wants to be in the movie, it’s worth it.”

According to Fosgate and Worden, the common concern with the seats is the risk of getting motion sickness during the movie. Typically, the D-Box seats do not cause a problem, as they move viewers in the same direction as the movie, while motion sickness occurs when the movement the body feels does not match the movement a person is seeing.

“I have horrible motion sickness,” Worden said. “And those movies don’t give you motion sickness. If they turn left, you turn left.”

Patrons also have the option to control the intensity of the movement with adjusters attached to the seats, which can intensify the motion or turn it completely off.

Howell junior Emma Wilson has tried the demo seats in the theater’s lobby, but did not agree with the notion of it being motion sickness-friendly. Wilson is prone to motion sickness and gets it whenever she spins or is riding in the car.

“It was very jarring,” Wilson said. “They moved in every direction. I felt like I would not enjoy watching a movie in them because they’re distracting.”

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