Board of Trustees / Featured / University

Trustees give Ross two-percent raise after ‘self-evaluation’

President George E. Ross announces that his 2% raise will be donated back to the university in the form of a scholarship for music majors on Thursday morning during a Board of Trustees meeting in Bovee University Center. (Katy Kildee | Staff Photographer)

President George E. Ross announces that his 2% raise will be donated back to the university in the form of a scholarship for music majors on Thursday morning during a Board of Trustees meeting in Bovee University Center. (Katy Kildee | Staff Photographer)

University President George Ross received a two-percent raise after receiving a favorable evaluation during Thursday’s Board of Trustees meeting.

Ross’s new yearly salary will total $371,280 effective January 2014.

“I want to thank the trustees for this vote of confidence,” Ross said. “This doesn’t get done alone. These are all big tasks and planning efforts, with hundreds of thousands of people involved in the process.”

Ross was given a full presidential evaluation last year and receives a full evaluation from trustees every three years, according to Board of Trustees Chairperson Brian Fannon. During this evaluation period, trustees solicit input on the university’s achievements the president directly affected.

Fannon added that nearly 60-70 different groups offered input last year, including students, faculty, staff, community members, business partners, the Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe and state government leaders, which included state representatives, senators and Lt. Gov. Brian Calley.

This year, trustees had Ross submit a self-evaluation to measure up his achievements against the goals of the university, which are laid out by CMU’s strategic planning outlook.

“As part of his contract, we put in mechanisms that would review our goals, and we’d measure how it would work,” Fannon said. “George’s work has been a success. Did we meet all of our goals? No. Did we meet most of them? Yes. Every year, we measure the president’s goals, and George did a great job of meeting those challenges.”

When asked what his biggest achievements were, Ross deferred to his self-evaluation.

“Anybody sitting in a leadership spot has specific challenges,” Ross said. “It’s about how you react to those challenges and whether you can remain focused on them.”

In Ross’ self-evaluation, the president cited eight areas in which he had a direct impact. The list of individual achievements totaled 103 improved areas.

Highlights from Ross’ list included: Charging a strategic planning committee with the development of new strategic goals, an academic prioritization plan, the development of a plan to help boost funded research, the deletion of 29 academic programs and two consecutive balanced budgets in 2010-11 and 2011-12 academic years.

Achievements in progress include the enrollment management plan and the university’s improved relations with the Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe.
“We’re proud of the four plans and what we’ve done to implement them,” Fannon said. “He’s done a great job so far based on the self-evaluation, based on the polls and what we’ve seen out of George so far.”

Ross announced he and his wife, Elizabeth, would create a scholarship fund for the music department with the extra money garnered by the increase – Ross wants to make the scholarship available for vocal music majors.

“The gift of that scholarship is a passion of my wife’s,” Ross said. “I don’t have the kind of talents she does. She’s been singing since she was in her church choir. We’ve been supporting students over the years with our philanthropy and we’ve always given back to the students. It’s just natural for us to do that.”

3 Comments

  1. Jeffrey Weinstock says:

    Interesting that this article fails to mention that Ross received a 4% pay increase in February of 2013.

  2. It’s also interesting that Ross, has the same reputation as Thamsanqa Jantjie (Mandela’s memorial fake signer) amongst CMU alumni!

  3. I never really understood this big game.

    When you visit Ivy League schools or even if you just walk around campuses like U of M, those buildings are nearly 100 years old and there aren’t any problems with the education.

    I feel like we spend so much time and energy focusing on having Ikea dorm rooms and suburbia looking architecture.

    My point is, the leaders of the colleges keep getting raises, but the costs just keep going up and up and up without really anything to show for it.

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