Winners announced at Mount Pleasant Campus Research Forum



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Need Patel addresses the audience on regulating cigarette smoke induced autophagy on Jan. 25 in the College of Medicine Auditorium.


Medical students were subjected to praise, discernment and curiosity as they exhibited their recent research successes at Central Michigan University’s College of Medicine.

Three second-year medical students gave oral presentations in front of a panel of judges at the final day of the second annual Mount Pleasant Campus Research Forum.

The event provided an opportunity for medical students to gain experience in presenting at research conferences. The forum also gave students an opportunity to build relationships outside the college, said medical faculty member Harold Bell.

“If people see that we’re doing something that aligns with their interests and expertise then a lot of good collaborations come about,” Bell said. “(This) potentially will open new doors to research opportunities (and encourage) research that would otherwise not occur if you didn’t get people together to talk and share interests.”

CMED invited faculty from the College of Science and Engineering and College of Health Professions to serve as judges. 

The featured second-year presenters were Neel Patel, Firas Shalabi and Cameron Kortes.

Kortes gave a presentation on the effects of breathing patterns in adult rats after being administered morphine, fentanyl, methadone, buprenorphine or oxycodone.

Patel, an Ontario native, spoke about the effects of cigarette smoking on people with chronic lung disease. 

The winning oral presentation came from Shalabi. The Ann Arbor native spoke about the scientific labeling of bone-marrow derived stem cells. 

Priya Nethala, a second-year student from New Hampshire, won first place in the poster presentation category, which was showcased on Jan. 17. 

Both winners were mentored by medical faculty member Julien Rossignol.

The winners began conducting their research early in their first year and continued to do so both during and after the summer period, Rossignol said.

“I’m proud and it’s a great day for my lab,” he said.

The event was open to everyone in the CMU and Mount Pleasant community. The forum appealed to freshman Rachel Deboer, who aspires to attend medical school after attaining an undergraduate degree.

“I thought it was super interesting. Some of the material was obviously over my head for my level of education at the moment, but I’m looking to get into research for some form of medicine or science,” she said. “It was a good introduction to how the research is represented and conducted.”

In order to fully attain the information presented one would need an “increased vocabulary” that she has yet to required, Deboer added. 


About Samantha Shriber

Samantha Shriber is a staff reporter at Central Michigan Life and is a Saint Clair Shores ...

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