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Universities Allied for Essential Medicines host "die-in" demonstration


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Members of the group, Universities Allied for Ecentral Medicines, gathered for the event "Die-In" on Nov. 5, 2015 in the courtyard outside of Anspach and Pearce. "Die-In" is an event where students fall to the ground and pretend to die to show the fact that every three seconds someone dies due to lack of medication.

Universities Allied for Essential Medicines, UAEM, hosted "die-in" outside of Anspach hall, this afternoon, Thursday Nov. 5.

UAEM is a global non-profit organization working for access, innovation and empowerment in global medicine. They aim to educate their members and other students about the importance of global medicine.

The "die-in" demonstration included Stevensville sophomore Dakota Cook giving a presentation about global medicine while students fell to the ground every three seconds to demonstrate the rate of death globally. The group collaborated with the World Health Organization to promote healthcare equality.

"One person dies every three seconds from diseases with available cures," said Newaygo senior and co-president of UAEM Mary Ann Franks. "Globally, ten million people a year will die due to this. That's as many people as the population of Michigan."

The demonstration was held this for Access to Medicine week, where students aim to spread awareness about the lack of access to medicine around the world.

Franks talked about the importance of affordable medicine all around the globe and how pharmaceutical companies monopolize, making medicine unaffordable for all people.

"People on a global average only make around one dollar a day," Franks said. "Even in the United States people aren't making a lot and can't afford the medication they need daily. Globally, there are people who need medicine for neglected diseases, but they just can't afford it. That needs to change."

The demonstration was held this for Access to Medicine week, where students aim to spread awareness about the lack of access to medicine around the world.

Quincy senior and co-president of UAEM Abby Parrish found her passion for global health after being involved in a variety of service trips. 

"I find that being a part of the organization is a way to address the issues I've seen first hand," Parrish said. "It's a way to learn about them and work on fixing them right here on campus. Seeing the impact that we can have on the world is really cool."

UAEM is also working on several other projects including a licensing agreement for non-executive patent, which would make a cure for a disease found at CMU affordable, and a social justice and global health certificate under the cultural and global studies major.

"It's really important that people are aware of the ongoing issues," Parrish said. "We can change things if we put in the effort and stand up together to make the change."

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