College of Science and Engineering to offer biochemistry graduate class


19293_logot

The College of Science and Engineering has begun offering a new graduate program for biochemistry, cell and molecular biology.   

The course will be offered on both a doctorate and a Master of Science degree level.

Core classes shared by both programs include: SCI 710, Bimolecular Structure and Function; SCI 720, Advances in Cell/Molecular Biology and Genetics, SCI 731 BCMB Colloquium; and SCI 740 Research Ethics.

Most of the core classes are to get students on the same page as each other, and the rest of the program relies on hands on research. Classes that fit the needs of each student, said assistant professor of biology Xantha Karp, who serves on the program committee for the course.

As of spring, three students have begun coursework. Karp said she expects five to 10 students to be enrolled by Fall 2018.

The program focuses on biomedical research, looking at molecules, cells and organisms. This research aims to determine what these assets of life teach about biomedicine and how they work to enable human health.

The program is associated with four different departments — biology, chemistry, biochemistry and the College of Medicine. Karp said several factors played into 

"There are a number of factors that make now a great time to implement the program," Karp said. "First, graduate enrollment at CMU has been increasing since 2012. Second, the opening of the new Biosciences building provides state-of-the art facilities to house the research that will be central to the BCMB programs."

Gaylord senior Mark Hansen, who has conducted undergraduate research in Karp’s lab for the past two-and-a-half years, plans on applying to the program for the Fall 2018 semester.

“The program is the next step to get more involved with research," Hansen said. "It's really tailored towards students and focused on research. Interdisciplinary is one of the things I really enjoy about the program."

Share: 


Comments powered by Disqus

Please note All comments are eligible for publication in Central Michigan Life.