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Holocaust memorial museum exhibit to visit CMU

(04/27/14 11:33pm)

A traveling exhibit from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C. will be making a stop at Central Michigan University this summer. Beginning May 14, the “Deadly Medicine: Creating the Master Race” exhibit will open in the CMU Museum of Cultural and Natural History in Rowe Hall. The exhibit, presented by the College of Medicine, will examine the different roles medicine played in the eventual mass genocide of millions of Jews in addition to millions of others during the Holocaust. Jim Knight, director of marketing and communications for CMED, said it's important for people to understand the impact medicine had during the Holocaust and the effect it had on practitioners across the globe. "Even after the war, it took generations for people to really trust doctors again," Knight said.


Cadaver legislation could allow people to donate their body to CMU

(04/27/14 11:33pm)

Alumni might soon be able to give more than money back to Central Michigan University as donations. That is, of course, if Michigan lawmakers pass a new piece of legislation allowing people to donate their bodies to universities as cadavers in Michigan. The legislation, House Bill 4341, aims to give interested philanthropists to allow their earthly vessels to classrooms for scientific study and cadaver-based learning activities.


CMED students taking outreach programs to local fourth graders

(04/15/14 11:58pm)

As the university's College of Medicine begins to grow from a fledgling operation to an institution in the Central Michigan University framework, the college is making its impression to young prospective students off campus. A group of 15 students, identified as the pediatrics special interest group, have been working with Renaissance Public School Academy in Mount Pleasant. The group organizes workshops for the school's fourth grade classes. “They really thought it was important for their own development to be able to do some outreach to some elementary school-aged kids," said Charmica Abinojar, director of Student Affairs for CMED.  "They want to plant the seed and show what it may be like to go into medicine.” Students in the group presented their first workshop to the class last month, which focused on items that might be found inside a doctor’s bag.



Faking it: CMED 'patient' program helps students diagnose illnesses

(04/03/14 11:58pm)

Growing up, faking sick either got you out of school for a day or in a heap of trouble for attempting it. But for those hired by the College of Medicine to take part in the Standardized Patient Program, the fine art of faking symptoms of illness is helping students learn, work and interact with real human patients. Standardized patients are individuals paid by the school to portray a patient with some kind of sickness or other side effect.










Department of psychiatry to begin training students in July

(12/04/13 7:00am)

Aiming to address nearby shortages in mental healthcare and to help build the bourgeoning College of Medicine, CMU's Health Division secured a psychiatry residency this fall. Under the umbrella of CMED, the residency will provide treatment for a wealth of psychological issues facing students and local residents as a fully-functioning psychiatric practice, and will train students looking for a career in psychiatry. The addition of the psychiatry department is also a requirement for CMED to be accredited through the Liaison Committee on Medical Eduacation, the national accrediting body for medical schools. "It has been a concern for years, this need for more psychiatrists in mid Michigan," said Chief of Psychiatry Ron Bradley.


CMED raises $21.3 million for Saginaw branch

(12/02/13 7:00am)

The College of Medicine has raised $21.3 million toward its funding goal for CMED East in Saginaw. Receiving $25,000 from the Mid Area Community Foundation and $20,000 from the Bay Area and Saginaw community foundations, the gifts put CMED at 85.2 percent of its funding goal of $25 million for the added location. Sharon Mortensen, CEO of the Midland Area Community Foundation, said CMED's proposed mission of addressing regional physician shortages in the Great Lakes Bay Region and across Michigan, is a dire concern for the people of her community. "The access to care is an issue to people in this community," she said.


CMED students to fill regional gaps in licensed care

(11/04/13 7:00am)

Many residents of northern and central Michigan are struggling to receive primary health care. Through partnerships with regional hospitals in rural and urban areas suffering from physician shortages, CMED hopes to ultimately send students into those areas to begin working on a solution. "Appointment availability is a real problem," said Associate Dean of Clinical Education and Hospital Relations Sean Kesterson.